les feux d'artifice t'appellent
And another new one.  Watercolor and acrylic on handmade watercolor paper, 11 x 15.

And another new one.  Watercolor and acrylic on handmade watercolor paper, 11 x 15.

Here is a new piece I just finished up.  (Sorry for the crooked photo.)
It is 9 x 12, watercolor and acrylic on Yupo.
Still deciding what to call it.

Here is a new piece I just finished up.  (Sorry for the crooked photo.)

It is 9 x 12, watercolor and acrylic on Yupo.

Still deciding what to call it.

poetsandwriters:

(As If a river should carry all / the scenes that it had once reflected / shut in its waters, and not floating / on momentary surfaces.)
From Elizabeth Bishop’s poem "The Weed."

poetsandwriters:

(As If a river should carry all / the scenes that it had once reflected / shut in its waters, and not floating / on momentary surfaces.)

From Elizabeth Bishop’s poem "The Weed."

Kathy Acker Interviews the Spice Girls for Vogue in 1997

creaturesofcomfort:

image
All Girls Together by Kathy Acker
The Spice Girls are the biggest, brashest girlie group ever to have hit the British mainstream. Kathy Acker is an avant-garde American writer and academic. They met up in New York to swap notes - on boys, girls, politics. And what they really, really want.
Fifty-second street. West Side, New York City. Hell’s Kitchen - one of those areas into which no one would once have walked unless loaded. Guns or drugs or both. But now it has been gentrified: the beautiful people have won. A man in middle-aged-rocker uniform, tight black jeans and nondescript T-shirt, lets Nigel, the photographer, and me through the studio doorway; then a chipmunk-sort-of-guy in shorts, with a Buddha tattooed on one of his arms, greets us warmly. This is Muff, the band’s publicity officer. We’re about to meet the Girls …
They are here to rehearse for an appearance on Saturday Night Live. Not only is this their first live TV performance, it’s also the first time they’ll be playing with what Mel C calls a ‘real band’. If the Girls are to have any longevity in the music industry, they will have to break into the American market; and for this they will need the American media. Both the Girls and their record company believe that their appearance here tonight might do the trick. There is a refusal among America’s music critics to take the Spice Girls seriously. The Rolling Stone review of Spice, their first album, refers to them as ‘attractive young things … brought together by a manager with a marketing concept’. The main complaint, or explanation for disregard, is that they are a ‘manufactured band’. What can this mean in a society of McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and En Vogue? However, an e-mail from a Spice fan mentions that, even though he loves the girls, he detects a ‘couple of stereotypes surrounding women in the band’s general image. The brunette is the woman every man wants to date. Perfect for an adventure on a midnight train, or to hire as your mistress-secretary. The blonde is the woman you take home to mother, whereas the redhead is the wild woman, the woman-with-lots-of -evil-powers.’ So who are these Girls? And how political is their notorious ‘Girl Power’? 

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mollysoda:

:(
blantonmuseum:

Yayoi Kusama, Inward Vision No. 1, 1953,Pastel, watercolor and ink, Gift of the Center for International Contemporary Arts; Emanuel and Charlotte Levine Collection, 1992.

blantonmuseum:

Yayoi KusamaInward Vision No. 1, 1953,Pastel, watercolor and ink, Gift of the Center for International Contemporary Arts; Emanuel and Charlotte Levine Collection, 1992.

cavetocanvas:

Joseph Beuys, How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare, 1965
One of the artist’s most famous performances, Beuys covered his head first with honey, and then with fifty dollars worth of gold leaf. He cradles a dead hare in his arms, and strapped an iron plate to the bottom of his right shoe. Viewed from behind glass in the gallery, the audience could see Beuys walking from drawing to drawing, quietly whispering in the dead rabbit’s ear. As he walked around the room, the silence was pierced by intermittent sound of his footsteps; the loud crack of the iron on the floor, and the soundless whisper of the sole of shoe. (via)

cavetocanvas:

Joseph Beuys, How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare, 1965

One of the artist’s most famous performances, Beuys covered his head first with honey, and then with fifty dollars worth of gold leaf. He cradles a dead hare in his arms, and strapped an iron plate to the bottom of his right shoe. Viewed from behind glass in the gallery, the audience could see Beuys walking from drawing to drawing, quietly whispering in the dead rabbit’s ear. As he walked around the room, the silence was pierced by intermittent sound of his footsteps; the loud crack of the iron on the floor, and the soundless whisper of the sole of shoe. (via)

puff-tentacle:

Dramatic dance of fire, passion. Alive. Mystic. Oneness

puff-tentacle:

Dramatic dance of fire, passion. Alive. Mystic. Oneness

mezcmarket:

Buddha Reflections by Harsh MalikOil on Canvas16” x 20”
For sale now on MezcMarket.com

mezcmarket:

Buddha Reflections by Harsh Malik
Oil on Canvas
16” x 20”

For sale now on MezcMarket.com

Bing Wright photographs exquisite nature scenes through broken mirrors. The results, as you can see, are stunning.